Tag: car audio

How to Tune an Amplifier

tuning_an_amp

In order to get the absolute best performance & sound quality from your amplifier it is very important to know exactly how to properly tune an amplifier. The most common misconception of tuning an amplifier is that the settings are intended to ‘give you the most power output’, this is not the case. This article will break down exactly what each common setting on an amplifier does and how to properly tune those settings.

For this example we are going to use the DC Audio 7.5k as an example. Onboard, it has the most common settings found throughout the market. The names might be a bit different, but they do the exact same thing, more on that later. Moreover, this article will cover each setting Right to Left – use the picture below to follow along – ending at the Gain, which is easily the most important setting of them all.
DC Audio 7.5k

  • Master/Slave Switch

  • The Master/Slave Switch is ONLY ever used when “Strapping” the amp with another identical-twin amp (i.e. Same Series, Model, etc..). Stay tuned for a future article on how this is done, But for this explanation we are assuming ONE amplifier one, so this switch must stay on MASTER. What does “Slave” do? Stay tuned for the explanation on “Strapping”.

  • Phase

  • Inverted Subwoofer
    The job of the phase setting is to do one thing: change the polarity/direction of the sub(s) being ran off the amp. The most common reason why you would want to use this setting is when you have an ‘inverted’ subwoofer*. You could, however, just as easily swap the polarities of each terminal and accomplish the same thing. Another reason why you would use the setting is if you have two drivers & two amps (one per driver), and one is “Out of Phase”. This means ONE driver is playing OUTWARD (away from the enclosure) and the ‘Out of Phase’ driver is playing INWARD (into the enclosure). What happens in this case is , in theory, the two sound waves coming off the driver cancel/eliminate each other, giving a very undesirable result. So when you hear someone say the driver is “out of phase” THIS is the go-to setting to try to fix that. Beyond that, rarely can an audible change be actually heard, but there are more variables beyond just the setting that will make a change.

    For our example, we assume the driver is wired properly, so this is left at 0

    *Inverted Subwoofers are often done for one of two reasons:

    1. To utilize the absolute most volume of the enclosure. Without a subwoofer displacing the air within the enclosure you have FULL use of that space.
    2. Because it looks cool. Yes, really.
  • LPF

  • Low Pass Filter.The LPF can be thought of as a “Ceiling”. The LPF will not allow the frequencies above where you set it to pass through. Technically speaking, there is a “Roll Off”, the LPF isn’t just a ‘wall’, but we won’t get into that here. The setting is intended to ‘filter out’ frequencies that which the driver – in this case a subwoofer – cannot play and/or will harm the driver if it does so. There isn’t a “right way” to set this, there is only the way the setup is configured and also what the limitations of the driver are.

    Suggestion: The most common (read: ‘dummy proof’) setting is 80Hz-120Hz

    Consider this, however, if the Full Range stage of your setup (i.e. Door Speakers) for some reason are incapable of playing below 120Hz , then you want the subwoofer to pick up at 120Hz; so the LPF will be set at 120Hz! This is because you wouldn’t want your sub Playing 80Hz and Down, then your Full Range Playing 120Hz and Up, because then you will have an inaudible gap between 80Hz-120Hz (i.e. Dead Space). For all intents and purposes we suggest to stick 80Hz; this will make sure all ‘mid-range’ is filtered out, and its often the most easily recognizable crossover point. Unfortunately, Most Amps do not tell you where a specific crossover point is , so you definitely need to ‘Eye Ball’ it. An overlap of frequencies – Sub vs Full Range – isn’t a “bad thing”, but for those who want the “Perfect Setup” you will have to have the right tools to hit the points you want. The only way of doing this is with the use of a Crossover Calibrator; we use the SMD CC-1 in our installation department to hit these points accurately.

  • Bass Boost

  • The Bass Boost is fairly self explanatory. It literally boosts the frequencies that you send it. We DO NOT recommend using this setting, if at all possible, because drivers go here to die. Assuming the amp is tuned right, there is seldom a reason to come to this setting. The reason it exists is because:

      1. Manufacture’s need to compete with another, so if multiple amps have this setting, then theirs does too
      2. It can actually have a practical use

    The latter only ever happens when the Full Range completely over powers – or “Drowns Out” – the subwoofers’ outputs. In order to “balance” the setup, you go to the Bass Boost to give the output a bit more output. THIS ISN’T A VOLUME KNOB!! You are toying with introducing a distorted signal if this setting isn’t used responsibly. Use at your own risk.

    Suggestion: Leave at 0

  • Subsonic

  • For all intents and purposes think of the Subsonic as a HPF (High Pass Filter), the ‘opposite’ of the LPF, or as a “Floor”. The Subsonic will not allow the frequencies below where you set it to pass through. Like the LPF, this setting is intended to ‘filter out’ frequencies that which the driver – in this case a subwoofer – cannot play and/or will harm the driver if it does so. This setting is often established by the limitations of the driver. For example, the NVX VCW104 has a frequency response of 20Hz-220 Hz, which means it is physically incapable of playing below 20Hz. This tells us that if we want to protect the driver, we should set the subsonic to 20Hz. Many in the industry will say that the ideal setting, for this example, would be ~25Hz because “just because its capable of doing 20Hz doesn’t mean it Should”. The often cited analogy is “your car Redlines at ~7,000 RPMs, that doesn’t necessarily mean you SHOULD ride the engine at 7k just because it can”. Nevertheless, in a properly tuned setup, and with an able/responsible user, there is very little concern for setting this point to the limitation presented by the driver.

    Suggestion: Set to 20Hz , for most subwoofers

  • Gain


  • This is NOT a volume control!! Whatever you want to call this setting, it is intended to do One thing and that is to match the sensitivity of the source/headunit. So, in theory, if your headunit provides a solid 5v out of the preouts, then the Gain (Sensitivity, Level, Input Level, Sensitivity Input, (V)) will match that when set properly. Due to several variables it is more likely that it is not going to match EXACTLY (i.e. at 5v) but it will come fairly close. Unfortunately, without special tools or an oscilloscope it is very hard to get this “Right”. It isn’t impossible to set this without special tools however. In fact, most installer set up their customers’ amps by ear! This will be the most common method you – the reader – will use. In addition, there is also a creative way of using a common DMM (Digital Multimeter) & Ohm’s Law to establish an AC Voltage Figure to aim for when adjusting the Gain; a quick search for this method will generate a lot of useful information. However, it is important to know that using the DMM method ASSUMES that the figures/variables you use are SPOT ON , which – to be fair – is not likely. This is because the rated figures on an amp are often rounded up/down, and – worse – a lot of manufactures will give overrated figures. So, using this method can be precarious if you the figures aren’t True To Spec.

    Suggestion: Too many variables to provide a “right answer”


    To Recap:
    Master/Slave – Master (Assuming ONE Amp)
    Phase – 0
    LPF – 80Hz
    Bass Boost – 0
    Subsonic – 20Hz
    Gain – ____
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    What are Bass Restoration Processors?

    When it comes to your car audio system, bass is an extremely important factor. In order for you to truly enjoy the music in your vehicle, you will need to be able to hear your music’s low frequencies! Although adding a subwoofer to your car audio system will definitely allow you to hear more of those low frequencies, a bass restoration processor digitally restores that heart-pounding bass that is still missing from your music. Bass restoration processors are the perfect add-on for those who want the lowest hitting bass possible. You can read this Knowledge Base Article if you’d like to learn about all the different types of sound processors.

    1How a Bass Restoration Processor Works

    A bass restoration processor, also called a bass booster or bass restoration processor, such as AudioControl’s Epicenter, has multiple adjustments which allow the user to bring out the ideal amount of bass for their music. Most of the time, they have three types ofAudioControl Epicenter adjustments: frequency, width, and level. The frequency adjustment allows you to choose the specific frequencies you would like brought out in your music. This allows you to have complete control over the bass in your system. Width adjustments on bass restoration processors allow you to choose the amount of frequencies that are affected. You can adjust the processor to affect a wide or narrow bandwidth of frequencies around the selected frequency. For example, if you have set the processor to affect 30 Hz, a narrow setting would only mainly affect that frequency, while a wide setting would affect a large range of frequencies around 30 Hz. Lastly, you can adjust the amount of manipulation for that selected frequency at the selected width, with the level adjustment. If you would like to get the most bass possible, you can crank the level knob up. In addition, you can also turn it all the way down if you would like to. For convenient adjusting of this setting, this knob is usually located on an included bass remote.

    2Types of Bass Restoration Processors

    Most bass restoration processors are the same, with some varying features such as different types of bass adjustments. Most of them include a bass remote, however there are a couple that do not have this accessory included. In addition, these sound processors have a variety of maximum output voltages. Lastly, most bass restoration processors have an auxiliary input, although there are a couple models that don’t come with this input.

    2How to Wire a Bass Restoration Processor

    Most bass processors are connected the same way. There are Ground, 12V power, and remote inputs on the processor that will all be hooked up to your aftermarket car stereo. The ground wire from your car stereos is going to go straight to the processor, the yellow 12V wire will also go straight from the car stereo to the processor, as well as the blue and white remote wire which will go from your car stereo – right to the bass processor. This will allow you to tie in power for the processor right from your car stereo. To get signal to the processor, you’re going to hook up an RCA from your car stereo’s subwoofer pre-out to the input of your monoblock amplifier. Then, you will use a jumper RCA connected from the output of your bass processor and into the input on your monoblock amplifier. And that’s all it takes to wire your bass processor up, so you can start restoring the bass in your car audio sound system.

    Bass Restoration Processors

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    What are Crossovers?

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    Believe it or not, there is a lot more that can go into a sound system than a headunit, speakers, subwoofer and amplifier. One such piece is a crossover. A crossover’s basic function is to take a single signal and split it up into multiple signals of specific frequency bands, low range, mid-range and high range frequencies. In a car audio system, the crossover then sends those frequency bands to the correct speaker (low frequencies to your subwoofer, mid-range to your speakers and high range to your tweeters).

    Speakers Crossover Network

    Without a crossover your system would waste a significant amount of energy trying to play frequencies it isn’t designed for, your subwoofer will be trying to play notes intended for your tweeters and vice-versa. This results in poor overall sound quality and can also be potentially hazardous to your system. Because of this, nearly every sound system will have some kind of crossover built-in.

    Now, as with all other aspects of your car’s sound system, your system can get by with its existing crossover, but if you want your system to truly reach its potential you’re going to need to add an aftermarket crossover.

    Active vs Passive: What’s the difference?

    There are 2 types of crossovers you can have in your system, an active crossover or a passive crossover. Passive crossovers don’t need a direct power source to filter signals while active crossovers need power and ground connections. The type of crossover you want really comes down to one thing, how much control do you want over your listending experience?

    xnet2
    Passive Crossover:

    Passive crossovers are unpowered and use capacitors and inductor coils to separate the sound frequencies for your system. A good example of a passive crossover is the crossovers that come with a component speaker system. Passive crossovers are wired in-line between the speakers in your system and the amplifier (or source). The passive crossovers that come with your component system come tuned and ready to be installed. One drawback of these crossovers is that because they are located after the amplifier, they waste power filtering a signal that has already been amplified.

    Another form of a passive crossover is the in-line crossover. An in-line crossover can come in a few different forms. One can essentially look like a AA battery with an RCA connection on either side and connects to your amplifier’s RCA inputs. Other in-line crossovers will protect your speakers from unwanted frequencies when used after the amplifier by separating the frequencies before they reach the driver.

    The biggest tradeoff with a passive crossover is ease of installation while sacrificing some flexibility in your system with the loss of sound customization.

    Active Crossover:
    6xs-gray

    Unlike passive crossovers, an active crossover requires a direct power source. Active crossovers are installed between your receiver and amplifier. As a result of this, active crossovers filter your frequencies before they reach your amplifier which means there is no wasted energy filtering amplified signals. Active crossovers also usually feature a variety of adjustments, including gain controls, low pass and high pass filters while select active crossovers feature built-in equalizers to give you the ultimate control over your system.

    The only real disadvantage to an active crossover is the installation. Since an active crossover has to have a power, ground and turn-on connection it has the potential to complicate your install more than a passive crossover. However, if you’re interested in making your system really sing, an active crossover is a must-add piece.

    Crossovers at Sonic Electronix

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    What is a Bluetooth Amplifier

    bluetooth-amp

    One of the best perks of constantly evolving technology is the new products that hit the market every year. While Bluetooth amplifiers aren’t technically new, RE Audio released the BT900.4 Bluetooth amp about a year ago, they are becoming increasingly more common with Cerwin Vega, Infinity, JBL and Kicker releasing their own Bluetooth amps with more sure to hit the market soon.

    If you drive an older car, chances are you probably don’t have Bluetooth. A Bluetooth amp is perfect for you if you aren’t interested in taking out your factory stereo to add an aftermarket stereo with Bluetooth. Not only will you add Bluetooth to your vehicle, you’ll be able to amplify your speakers and improve the overall performance of your system.

    Why You Want One

    • Stream Music Through Your System Directly from Your Amplifier
    • Eliminate the Need of an Expensive Head Unit
    • Amplify Your System

    How Bluetooth Amplifiers Works

    Bluetooth Amplifier Diagram

    A Bluetooth amplifier is actually a pretty basic piece of equipment. It functions and installs just like any other amplifier would (they can be connected to a source unit, but it isn’t required), it just has an integrated Bluetooth module installed in it allowing you to connect virtually any Bluetooth enabled device (smartphones, tablets, etc.) to it wirelessly. Bluetooth amps eliminate the need of a traditional head unit because they allow the amp to double as the receiver.

    Kicker PXiBT50.2

    Common Applications

    One of the things that makes a Bluetooth amplifier great is the flexibility it provides you with. While a Bluetooth amplifier will make an excellent addition your car’s sound system, they are also a perfect fit for marine and power sports use, as well as just about any other application that requires an amplifier.

    In the Car

    A Bluetooth amplifier adds another, and perhaps the most efficient way to add Bluetooth to your car. Many older stereos don’t have built-in Bluetooth simply because it wasn’t a common feature. Until the release of Bluetooth amplifiers the only way to add Bluetooth to your vehicle was through a new, potentially costly, Bluetooth headunit or a Bluetooth adapter that was compatible with your stereo. With a Bluetooth amp you can knock out two birds with one stone. You’ll add the convenience of wireless Bluetooth streaming to your car while also amplifying your existing system. Some Bluetooth amps also include a wired microphone, enabling hands-free phone calls.

    On the Boat

    Bluetooth amplifiers aren’t just for use in your car, they’re also a great for streaming music out on the lake. Many boats don’t even have a sound system installed, so if you want to add a system you’re probably going to need to build it from the ground up. A marine rated Bluetooth amplifier allows you to skip over a head unit all together, saving you money while improving the performance of the rest of the system. And much like in your car if your boat does have a sound system and the head unit isn’t Bluetooth enabled, a Bluetooth amplifier can save you from having to change out the stereo.

    On the ATV

    For anyone interested in outdoor power sports, you know that free space is incredibly limited. Installing a sound system in an ATV, UTV, SSV or motorcycle can be a tricky proposition because of this and anything you can do to save space can be invaluable. A Bluetooth amp can consolidate your source unit and amplifier into one piece of equipment without sacrificing the ability to actually play music through your system.

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    What Type of Digital Sound Processor (DSP) Do I Need?

    When it comes to digital sound processors, there are a few different types which have different benefits and are used to achieve different things. Digital sound processors consists of equalizers, bass restoration processors and expanders, line drivers, crossovers, and factory radio sound processors. Each of these sound processors will improve your specific sound system in a different way. If you want the most out of your sound system, a quality sound processor is essential. After some slight adjustments with any of these devices, your system will sound like it has been professionally tuned and optimized. Read more to find out which sound processor your system could benefit from.


    1Equalizers

    NVX XEQ7

    An equalizer, like the NVX XEQ7, is a device that allows you to fine tune your car’s sound to your liking. These adjustments that an equalizer allows you to make are for specific ranges of sound known as ‘frequency bands’. An equalizer will smooth out the frequency response of your system and help you eliminate unwanted distortion. If you want to have precise control over your sound, you’re going to need to add an equalizer. Adding an equalizer to your sound system will allow you to tune your sound to match your preferences, as well as to the acoustics of your specific car. Read more about equalizers here.

    2Bass Restoration Processors + Expanders

    AudioControl Epicenter

    Bass restoration processors, or bass expanders, improve the low frequency reproduction in a car audio system with at least one subwoofer. Bass expander products, such as the famous AudioControl Epicenter, will help your car’s subwoofers produce more accurate bass. These devices restore the earth-shaking power and heart-pounding bass your subwoofers crave. If you are looking for a system that hits lower and harder, a bass restoration processor is the sound processor for you.

    3Crossovers

    Electronic crossovers, such as the AudioControl 2XS divide your car’s music into high, low and midrange frequency ranges. These crossovers are perfect for those who want to run an active sound quality system. With an electronic crossover, you can eliminate the passive crossovers and have more control over the frequencies that go to each of the speakers in your system. Some of these crossovers are combinations of both stereo crossovers and stereo equalizers or line drivers.

    4Line Drivers

    Line drivers will enhance your audio signal output coming from any factory or aftermarket head unit receiver. They help increase the volume output without over-driving your source or amplifier. The use of a line driver, such as the AudioControl OverDrive, in your car audio system will allow your amplifier’s gain to be set lower, and reducing the system’s low-level noise.

    5Factory Radio Sound Processors

    JBL MS-8

    For those who want to keep their factory radio, yet would also like to achieve the best sound possible in their vehicle, factory radio sound processors are just the thing for you. These sound processors, like JBL’s MS-8 Digital Sound Processor, are professional sound processors which improve the acoustics of your factory audio system. With factory radio sound processors, your factory system will sound better than you ever thought possible. In addition, most of these sound processors also have built-in equalizers, line drivers, and crossovers to  improve every measure of audio performance including frequency response, bass performance, dynamics, clarity, detail and stereo imaging.


     

    Now that you know what each type of digital sound processor’s function and benefits are, you can better make a decision of which one is best for your sound system. If, however, you still need help choosing which sound processor will work for you, you can always call our knowledgeable experts at 1-877-289-7664!

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    Apple CarPlay Car Stereos

    Apple CarPlay Installed by Sonic Electronix

    Apple CarPlay is the latest in iPhone integration and offers a powerful way to interface your iPhone device with your car stereo. No more trying to fumble around with controlling your iPhone on an confusing interface. Apple CarPlay is designed for the car to make your life easier, create a safer driving experience, basically just be awesome.

    What is Apple CarPlay?

    Apple CarPlay is a smarter, safer way to use your iPhone in the car. It allows your iPhone (iPhone 5 or later) to completely integrate with your compatible car stereo and bring your iOS experience into the car with ease. CarPlay features Siri Eyes Free mode which allows you to navigate through your phone and apps by voice command, keeping your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. With CarPlay, you can get directions, make calls, send and receive messages and listen to your favorite music without ever reaching for your phone.

    How does Apple CarPlay work?

    CarPlay works by plugging your iPhone in to your car stereo via USB. It is important to note that CarPlay is on your iOS device and not your stereo. Once connected, a customized version of iOS, designed by Apple, will display on your stereo complete with icons and Siri support. Once connected and running, you’ll be able to control your iPhone through the touchscreen controls of your stereo or through voice commands.

    1. Connect Your iPhone to the Stereo Through USB
    2. Open Your Favorite Apps
    3. Control Via Voice Control or Touchscreen
    4. Keep Your Eyes on the Road and off Your Phone

    Apple CarPlay is all about being safe while driving. Controlling your phone through voice commands and your stereo stops you from having to reach for your phone to answer a call, check your directions or see what song is playing and leaves your hands and eyes free to concentrate on the road.


    Car Stereos with Apple CarPlay

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    Android Auto Car Stereos

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    Android Auto is the latest in Android integration and offers a powerful way to interface your Android device with your car stereo. No more trying to fumble around with controlling your Android smartphone on an confusing interface. Android Auto is designed for the car to make your life easier, create a safer driving experience, basically just be awesome.

    What is Android Auto?

    To put it simply, Android Auto is Android in your car. Android Auto was created by Google to bring the Android operating system into your car. An Android Auto compatible car stereo allows you to completely integrate your Android device (running the Android Lollipop or newer OS) with your vehicle’s sound system. It is optimized for voice commands for both apps like Google Maps and Google Play Music and convenience features like phone calls and messaging so that you never have to take your hands off the wheel. Android Auto also works with many third party apps like Pandora, Spotify, iHeartRadio and MLB At Bat.

    How does Android Auto work?

    Android Auto is on your phone, not built-in to the stereo. It projects a customized version of your compatible Android device onto the screen of the stereo (devices need to be connected via USB).The interface projected is very simple and intuitive and can be controlled from the touchscreen display or by voice commands.

    1. Connect Your Android Device Through USB
    2. Open Your Favorite App
    3. Control Via Voice Control or Touchscreen
    4. Keep Your Eyes on the Road, Not Your Phone

    When you drill it down to its core, Android Auto is really about driver safety. The ability to control your phone through voice commands and touch screen controls on your stereo means you won’t be reaching for your phone to answer a call, check your GPS or skip to the next song. Concentrate on what’s important, the road, with Android Auto.


     

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    How to Replace Super Tweeters

    As you may be aware, tweeters are an essential part of any car audio system in order to really get the most out of your music’s high frequencies. The great thing about some super tweeters, is that they are fully rebuildable. Therefore, if something happens to your super tweeter -instead of throwing away the whole thing, you can just buy a rebuild kit! This rebuild process is extremely easy, and today we are going to show you exactly how to rebuild your super tweeter, while using the Audiopipe ATR4421 heavy duty super tweeter as an example.

     

    1Get Your Super Tweeter Rebuild Kit

    Before you begin rebuilding your tweeter, you will need a voice coil rebuild kit – such as the Audiopipe ATV4421 tweeter rebuild kit. Once you have this replacement voice coil kit, you can start rebuilding your super tweeter!

     

    2Taking Apart the Tweeter

    To start, remove the three philips head screws from the top of the tweeter and the one philips head screw from the bottom of the tweeter. Once you have removed all of the screws, you can remove the phase plug off of the top of the voice coil and place it somewhere safe until it is time to put your tweeter back together.

    3Replace the Voice Coil

    The next step is to replace the voice coil. Simply remove the defective voice coil off the top of the magnet and replace it with the new replacement voice coil.

    4Put the Super Tweeters Back Together

    Once the new voice coil is in place, the next step is to place the phase plug on top of the voice coil. Once the phase plug is in place, flip over the tweeter to replace the bottom screw. This will make sure the phase plug is in place. Next, you will turn the tweeter back over, take your tweeter’s top plate, and place it on top of the tweeter. Lastly, take the three screws you removed from the top of the tweeter earlier, and put those back in the tweeter’s top plate so that the top plate is firmly secured to your new voice coil.

    And that’s it! This is a incredibly easy process which will ensure that your heavy duty super tweeter lasts a long time. Until next time, we’ll cya later!

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    Car Audio 101: Car Amplifiers

    An amplifier is really a simple piece of your aftermarket sound system. A car amplifier basically amplifies a signal from a source (in the case of a car sound system, your stereo) to a much greater signal. Signals from source units are typically fairly low voltage, which is fine for most speakers (but not subwoofers), amplifying your speakers will make them perform to their full potential. Now, your speakers can be powered by just your source unit, but a subwoofer will require an amplifier. Giving your system more power will improve both sound quality and how loud your system will play.

    When looking for an amplifier, it’s important to know what you intend to use it for. If you’re simply adding a subwoofer to your system you will only need a monoblock amp while with a complete system (4 speakers and a subwoofer) your best bet is either a 4 channel and a monoblock or a 5 channel amplifier. It is critical to the success of your sound system that you match up all of your equipment (speakers, subwoofer, source unit) with the right amplifier to make sure everything is powered properly to give you the best sound possible.

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    Car Audio 101: Car Speakers

    After upgrading to an aftermarket car stereo, your next move is to upgrade your factory speakers. Factory speakers are made from cheap, flimsy materials and are not designed for quality sound reproduction. Because of their low quality construction, factory speakers don’t tend to last very long. Factory speakers also do not always have a tweeter. Without a tweeter, your factory speakers will struggle to reproduce the highs in your music which results in mediocre (at best) sound quality. Aftermarket speakers on the other hand are built from much higher quality materials and feature a much more efficient design. These allow aftermarket speakers to offer greater power handling capabilities, overall sound quality as well as a greatly improved lifespan over your old factory speakers.

    To go along with their better overall design and construction, aftermarket speakers also include a tweeter. Aftermarket speakers are most commonly available in either component or coaxial design. A coaxial speaker has the tweeter built into the frame of the speaker whereas with a component speaker the tweeter is a separate unit. Component speakers also include an external crossover network. Because component speakers have the tweeter as a separate unit, you can install the tweeter in a separate location from the speaker which allows for better overall sound quality.

    Before you buy a set of aftermarket speakers, it is important to look in your car to see what kind of setup your car is configured for. Different cars come with different sound systems, different speakers types and even different speaker sizes.

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